Daily News - Thursday 13 February 2014

Posted 13 February 2014 8:20am
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Closing the gap that scars Australia: stop our mob from dying prematurely

Mick Gooda and Kristie Parker, The Guardian

Health inequality between Indigenous and other Australians is a stark reminder of the great divide in our nation, and a cause of terrible suffering and grief.

The creeping barrage of political language

David Hetherington, The Drum

By trying to redefine our understanding of "fairness" and "poverty", the Australian conservative movement is paving the way for its pro-business, anti-welfare agenda.

Is Australia’s welfare system unsustainable?

Peter Whiteford, Inside Story

Figures from the past two decades challenge the view that the welfare budget is out of control.

A fare cop: state loses $120m every year to passengers who don't pay

Jacob Saulwick, Alexandra Back, The Sydney Morning Herald

Public transport fare evaders cost NSW about $120 million a year, according to the first detailed survey of Sydney's bus, rail and ferry passengers.

Abortion laws 'among worst in the world'

Jane Lee, The Age

Balance-of-power Frankston MP Geoff Shaw has reiterated his desire for changes to the state's abortion laws calling them among "the worst in the world" and saying he wanted reforms introduced before the next election.

Asylum seekers: consultancy behind graphic campaign holds $2m contract

Oliver Laughland and Asher Wolf

STATT, whose controversial novel aims to deter Afghan asylum seekers, has also predicted their mass displacement. 

Care 4 Kids: Questions over how door-knocking charity spent $500k earmarked to help struggling schoolchildren

Madeline Morris, The ABC

A charity which says it helps children who have fallen behind at school has collected nearly $1 million in donations, but cannot account for how all the money supposedly paid to beneficiaries has been spent.

Devil in the detail of asylum seeker directive

Andrew Hamilton, Eureka Street

n books and films the enormity of a complex and fraught situation is often conveyed by a detail that is quite tiny in the larger picture. 

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